Posts Tagged ‘time travel’

 

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One trailer shy of a Furious 7 joke. Sigh.

I know a lot of people are concerned that the bubble’s going to burst on movies geared towards those of the geekier sort. If, however, the quality of the six movies whose trailers dropped within the last two weeks is any indication of their quality, then I think we’re good, where movies are concerned, for the next couple years. The last four days alone have seen most of those trailers released into the murky atmosphere of the internet, so I thought I’d go ahead and give you my thoughts on these films based on the most recent and previous trailers.large_trailer

Spoiler alert: I plan to see all of these films. I may have reservations about a few, some more than others, but I’m also the type of person who likes to experience the entire movie before I decide whether it’s the new love of my life, the biggest assault on the senses since Batman & Robin, or a disposable piece of fluff.

I’m just that type of girl. Go figure. Anywho, on to the trailers.

Second spoiler warning: The Terminator Genisys trailer gives away the biggest twist of the movie, so if you’ve managed to avoid it and want to remain in the dark I’d recommend scrolling down really, really fast and move on to the next trailer at a furious pace!

Jurassic World – June 12, 2015

Since the first trailer dropped I’ve been on board with the concept of Jurassic World as the logical extension of the original Jurassic Park (1993). Park and World share the same themes of scientific and corporate hubris with World upping the ante as the genetically modified dinosaur created to boost attendance wreaks havoc on the park. Previous trailers and clips have shown the movie will definitely be calling back to some of the more well-known moments in the first film while sticking to the tried and true formula of monster movie scares, dinosaur fights, and possibly some philosophical discussion about blah, blah, blah and oh my God Chris Pratt on a motorcycle riding with his velociraptor hunting pack! Ahem. Sorry, what was I talking about? Anyway, at the very least the movie promises to at least be visually stunning with each park attraction having a very Disney-esque immersion happening. And I know this is wishful thinking, but if there’s any chance Jeff Goldblum’s Ian Malcolm could make a for real cameo, I’d consider this movie a win.

Terminator Genisys – July 1, 2015

Yeah, I’m not sure why a trailer was made that gives away what would arguably be the biggest mind-blowing moment in the movie, but there ya go. Either the filmmakers and the production company really think Arnold Schwarzenegger’s return to the franchise will put butts in seats just because or they’re really worried no one will see this movie because the last two installments didn’t do them any favors. To be fair, the premise is intriguing. With all the time travel that goes on in the myopic missions of machines trying desperately to eliminate one dude from the timeline, the idea of alternate timelines and what if scenarios actually makes sense. Of course, the type of time travel setup in the Terminator movies requires time to be linear otherwise John Connor’s future would keep changing. There’s also the notion of fate and fixed points in time because the machines keep sending assassins to kill John and his mother and yet they never succeed. But I’ve already put too much thought into this movie. Sorry, time travel as a narrative device is one of those things I obsessively pick apart. But hey, Emilia Clarke looks like a rad young Sarah Connor!

Ant-Man – July 17, 2015

I like the trailers for this movie more and more. Yes, it’s disappointing that Janet Van Dyne, a founding member of the Avengers has been all but written out of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but here’s hoping that Evangeline Lilly’s Hope Van Dyne will become the Wasp and give Ant-Man a run for his money! After the teaser trailer left something to be desired based on the performance of previous Marvel trailers, this one definitely makes up for it in every way possible. Better jokes showing off Paul Rudd’s endless charm as thief turned hero, Scott Lang, and a nice hero turned mentor dynamic set up between Lang and Michael Douglas’ older Hank Pym. Since Hank was also a founding member of the Avengers in the comics, it’ll be interesting to see how they incorporate the Ant-Man origins into a world where superheroes have only been a recent thing. Plus, I’m really digging the effects as Ant-Man and Yellowjacket shrink and grow during their fights. Even though the climactic battle will occur in Scott’s daughter’s room among her toys, director Peyton Reed promises there’s much more to it than just a cute shot of an epic battle on a Thomas the Tank Engine.

Fantastic Four – August 7, 2015

The Fantastic Four…with powers! Much better, 20th Century Fox. Like Ant-Man, the Fantastic Four teaser trailer didn’t exactly wow anyone, but this trailer feels like we’re getting a better idea of what the movie will actually be about. Yes, the premise for Marvel’s first family has always been a bit hokey, but there’s plenty to work with as the crux of the movie will center on Reed Richard’s genius that leads to the discovery of another dimension and ultimately changes him and his friends into superpowered heroes. Oh, and Doctor Doom is there too. Doooooom! Reed’s sense of responsibility and his guilt are a huge driving force behind the character so I’m interested in seeing how this will play out in the movie. Crucial to this is the friendship between Reed and Ben Grimm, so hopefully the dynamic between Miles Teller and Jamie Bell has some meat to it. Otherwise we’re just looking at four strangers who happen to get cosmic powers, live together and have their lives taped. Like a superhero Real World. So, yeah, I like what I see from director Josh Trank so far. The effects look amazing and there was actually some humor. Thumbs up for now!

Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens – December 18, 2015

As someone who only looks at Star Wars through the movies (I know, I know Clone Wars and Rebels are part of the canon), I held out a lot of hope for Episode VII after being terribly disappointed by the prequels. Thankfully, it looks like J.J. Abrams will be doing right by the franchise because I love every friggin’ second of this trailer. The opening shot of the Star Destroyer is gorgeous and Luke’s narration made all the goosebumps happen. Do I really need to explain how awesome that final shot was? Do I? It’s Han and Chewie, for cryin’ out loud! This looks like the movie we’ve been waiting for as the older generation gets ready to pass the baton down to the next. How John Boyega, Daisy Ridley, and Oscar Isaac’s characters factor into the universe post-Return of the Jedi still remains unclear, but that’s part of the fun. If all I have going into this movie are the ridiculously awesome visuals, then I’m still going in content with my ignorance of the plot. I want to be surprised by this movie and fall in love with Star Wars all over again.

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – March 25, 2016

Okay, not gonna lie, I’ve been down on the burgeoning DC Cinematic Universe for a while. Not because I dislike DC Comics, quite the opposite. I’ve been a DC fan since before I can remember, but Man of Steel was so underwhelming – for me – that it’s going to take a lot to change my mind about what this franchise can offer. At the very least, Batman v Superman holds promise. It won’t be out for another year, but I’m hoping Chris Terrio’s script tackles the rivalry and eventual friendship of Bats and Supes in a way that at least makes sense despite borrowing heavily from Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns wherein their decades long friendship falls apart. Throw in a dizzying amount of cameos from other DC heroes and it’s quite the ambitious start on the road to Justice League. The religious connotations are, of course, present. Looks like Zack Snyder will be following up on the destruction of Metropolis and what it means to have a superpowered “savior” among us. Supes and religion isn’t new territory and Snyder isn’t shying away from the obvious symbolism, so hopefully the script handles it with some subtlety…please? Other than that, Henry Cavill still looks great as Superman and Ben Affleck looks good for the few seconds we get of him as Bruce Wayne and Batman. I’m pretty sure people will be griping about the “Batman gravel” in his voice, but those things don’t bother me. I just want to be able to walk out of a theater next March pumping my fist in the air and shouting “Yeah, Bats and Supes!”

So those are the most recent trailers. What did you guys think? Which movies are you the most excited for and does the trailer factor into that excitement?

SamJack_03-pr-2This was originally posted at Word of the Nerd on December 20th.

You know you’re in good hands when the opening of every comic includes the insanely awesome and informative opening sequence from the cartoon! Yes, the fan favorite/cult classic/just plain classic cartoon, Samurai Jack, has returned to us in comic book form.

Written by Jim Zub (Skullkickers) and drawn by Andy Suriano, the new Samurai Jack comic stays true to the episodic nature of the cartoon while giving Jack a specific goal in his quest to return to his home and proper time period so he can vanquish the demonic Aku. The “Threads of Time” arc sees Jack gathering threads from the broken Rope of Eons, which Aku frayed when he mastered time travel. Once Jack has recovered the threads, he’ll be able to rewind the rope and rewind time. In the first issue, Jack faced a group of gladiators fighting in an underground arena overseen by a malicious spider. While in the second, he went up against twin cats named Dis and Dat who used their thread to synchronize their attacks. Besting all of them, Jack prevails, but he’s not without his setbacks as each new foe challenges and pushes him further. No matter what, Jack is still a warrior possessed with determination to complete his quest.

Samurai JackIssue three finds Jack in the village of Grantus, a peaceful place under the protection of the affable Gloer the Great who grants Jack shelter, food and a little sparring practice. All in good fun though. The only downside seems to be that the people of Grantus ignore Jack, but Gloer assures him that they’ve been encouraged to ignore strangers until they’ve been around long enough to not be strangers. Everything changes, however, when Aku’s robotic forces attack Grantus and Jack learns the shocking truth about Gloer.

The issues thus far have been worthy successors to Genndy Tartakovsky’s cartoon. Jim Zub has crafted an arc that stays true to the character and his motivations while also giving Jack ample reason to show off his impressive fighting techniques. The shift in medium obviously makes the storytelling process a bit different, requiring more narration and dialogue in cases where the cartoon would have relied on atmosphere and silence. Not that this can’t be accomplished in a comic, but Zub has to work a bit harder to retain the spirit of Jack’s character and the world he inhabits. Thankfully, Zub keeps Jack’s dialogue to a minimum when he can, relying on the dialogue of other characters to fill in the blanks or letting the art of Andy Suriano speak for the comic. Suriano, by the way, knocks it out of the park with his work, which makes sense since he worked on the Samurai Jack cartoon as a character designer. But in the pages of the comic he gets to bring the epicness of Jack’s quest to life. You never doubt this is Samurai Jack and if I can’t have the cartoon, then at least I can have the comic.

Final Thoughts: If you love Samurai Jack, then you should be reading this comic. Try and read the opening segment without hearing the voice of the late Mako as Aku. I dare you!

halloween tree titleSometimes I wonder if the cartoons I remember from my childhood were real or something I thought I saw and then, as the idea grew, believed it so much that it became real. Luckily, thankfully, I didn’t make this one up; Ray Bradbury did. The Halloween Tree, a children’s book written by Bradbury in 1972, tells the tale of a group of trick ‘r treating friends who chase the spirit of their beloved, Halloween loving friend, Pipkin, across time with the help of the mysterious Carapace Clavicle Moundshroud. In the process of trying to save their friend’s life, they learn the true origins of the costumes they wear as they explore various celebrations honoring the hallowed connection between mortals and spirits from Ancient Egypt to modern day Mexico.

The book had actually been going through development limbo for some time before Hanna-Barbera finally produced an animated television movie in 1993 that went on to win an Emmy in 1994. The movie was adapted by Bradbury for television with the author also lending his voice as the narrator. In the film, the premise is essentially the same, though the eight boys in the book are reduced to three, Tom, Wally, and Ralph, and the token girl of the group, Jenny. Donning their costumes (a skeleton, mummy, monster, and witch respectively) in order to meet up with their group leader, and Halloween prankster, Joseph Pipkin, or Pip, the four friends quickly learn that Pip has appendicitis and can’t join them for their typical trick ‘r treating antics. But when they believe they see Pip running through the woods, they chase his spectral apparition to the gothic home of Mr. Moundshroud and begin their journey to save Pip as he leads them on a wild goose chase across time.

Pips FriendsI remember this movie airing a few years in row as a kid, though it’s only recently that I rediscovered it online. A happy accident in my opinion as I got to relive some memories from my childhood while appreciating the quality of the movie as an adult. As a student of history, I adore Bradbury’s time-traveling tale that shines a light on the historical origins of the costumes worn by the group. His surrogate narrative voice, Moundshroud (played amazingly by Leonard Nimoy), is quick to dole out exposition on the spiritual practices observed by the people of Ancient Egypt, the persecution of witches in “the Dark Ages”, the purpose of monsters as reminders of the darkness we try to ward off, and the value of life over the fear of death as seen through Dia de los Muertos. It’s a fantastic story that paints Halloween as more than just a night of frivolity and candy consumption, but the culmination of various cultural practices, some of which are still practiced and celebrated today.

Historical context aside, the message sent to children elevates this television movie above most. In chasing Pip, the group learns that the jack o’ lantern he’s stolen off the Halloween Tree represents Pip’s soul; the fading light his tenuous hold on life. Each history lesson allows the individual friends to encourage Pip to fight, recounting the ways in which Pip has been a true friend to them while they, in turn, conquer their own fears and admit their foibles. The moments are oddly cathartic, as if Tom, Wally, Ralph, and Jenny are paying their last respects to their friend even as they try to save him. In the end, they make a deal with Moundshroud – one year off the end of their lives in exchange for Pip’s. Unable to pass up four for the price of one, Moundshroud agrees and Pip survives his illness. Finding him recovering at home (on the same night as a major surgery for some reason) tears are shed as Pip thanks them even if he’s not quite sure if everything he dreamed was real. It’s a beautiful message about friendship, loyalty, and sacrifice. How far would you go for your friend? What would you give up to ensure their survival?Moundshroud

For a movie made 20 years ago, it holds up surprising well. The animation is still good save for a few moments where it looks like they weren’t quite sure what to do with the characters in terms of their movements. Moundshroud is wonderfully creepy, yet still likeable as a mysterious creature in the business of collecting souls. I suppose there’s a reason he’s not that enthused to step into the moonlight shining through Notre Dame cathedral. That being said, it’s still a very dated movie, not so much in the early 90s (though you will get tired of hearing Ralph say, “Oh my gosh!” repeatedly), but in a sort of timeless nostalgia. It’s like Bradbury is trying to encapsulate the idyllic nature of childhood in one fell swoop. It may come off as a little cheesy, but hearing Bradbury read his own prose is entirely worth the it.

So if you have 70 minutes to spare, sit down with your kids and watch what I consider a Halloween classic.