Posts Tagged ‘empathy’

Dear Indy,

Yes, Harrison, that name will be sticking around and by the time you’re old enough to read this, I assume I’ll have called you it enough times that it won’t be weird or embarrassing. But who cares what other people think, right? Right? Right.15179008_10207740993223781_4279690723091371069_n

Oh, baby boy, you’re only four days old as I’m writing this and I honestly don’t know how the next fours years of your life are going to be. I thought I’d be proud that you would only know a black man and white woman as the President of the United States for the first few years of your life. Now, whenever you look at those God-awful history books they’ll likely try to alter, you’re going to see the face of a neon cheeto smiling smugly at you like he owns the world. He doesn’t, sweetie. He just thinks he does. Trust me when I say, I will and have spent those four years pushing back in every way I can because you deserve better than what this country gave you. You deserve enlightenment, harmony, and peace of mind. You deserve an education. You deserve the freedom to express yourself. You deserve love, sympathy, and empathy in abundance. You deserve the simple basics of humanity. But you have to give it back as well.

You’re white, sweetheart. Shocker, I know. You’re white and you’re a boy/teen/man/gender fluid/undefined (whenever you’re reading this, pick the one that applies), which means you’re still going to have more chances to succeed than your friends in school who are of a different race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or creed. It may not seem like it, but the system you were born into currently favors you above anyone else. People much smarter and braver than your Auntie Sammy are trying to fix that, but progress is always slow so I can’t rightly say this paragraph will be irrelevant by the time you’re reading and comprehension lessons start. I like to err on the side of caution and assume the worst. By now you probably know that and find it to be an endearing quality. Don’t roll your eyes…unless it’s something your grandfather said, then roll away!

The point is you’re going to have a lot more privileges by virtue of the sex and race you were born compared to others. This means you’re obligated to do the following things:

  1. Listen
  2. Learn
  3. Experience
  4. Elevate

First, listen to voices that aren’t your own. Talk to people who aren’t like you. There is so much more to be gained when you offer a sympathetic ear. We’re social creatures, humans, and we’re more inclined to talk and share our experiences, our knowledge, and our wisdom. Trust me, sweetie, I’ve learned more by listening to people on my podcast (which I’m sure is hugely successful!) than any previous endeavor or project. My music, reading lists, movies and television preferences have all been influenced or altered because of the people I’ve talked to and I intend to keep expanding those horizons because it’s the only way to grow.alana-02

Secondly, I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to educate yourself. Teachers and school administrations have their own agendas, their own quotas to meet, and that can sour you towards the institutions of higher learning, but believe me when I say that the greatest investment of your time will be in developing your mind. And I’m not just talking about reading a lot of books (we’ll get to that), I’m talking about engaging with the written word; questioning everything and critically thinking your way through the loftier questions. You may not always find the answers you were looking for, but getting there is half of the adventure. The other half is writing a dissertation, but we’re not there yet so we’ll put that on the backburner for now.

Above all else, though, you need to read about the world outside of yourself. It’s easy to retreat and find everything and everyone that’s like you, but it’s important to read about people who aren’t like you, places you’re never been, and things that are completely foreign to you. Read every genre of fiction, non-fiction, plays, and poetry. Read the classics, essays, comic books, and biographies. Read the dictionary. Seriously, read the dictionary. And get a thesaurus. The more words you have available to you the better. Like I said about listening, learning and self-education will do wonders for your ability to understand and empathize with others. It also gives you the confidence and wherewithal to engage others with whom you disagree. Words are powerful weapons, my dear, and I intend to make sure you’re suitably armed.

Thirdly, experience the world. Reading – and probably video games – will only get you so far, my love. The rest is gained by stepping outside your door. Go to the theater, museums, arts and music festivals. Do extra-curricular activities like drama, debate, and one of those sports-ball things. Play an instrument. If you’re anything like the rest of our family you may give up after a year or so, but at least you can say you tried. Eat foods you’ve never eaten before, but don’t rush it since it may take a while before you’re beyond the peanut butter and jelly sandwich only phase. Go hiking, rock climbing, fossil hunting, anything your heart desires as long as it brings you closer to appreciating what you have and what the world has to offer. The more you engage, the more you’ll care about keeping this ball of rock, water, and gas spinning.

Lastly, and most importantly, use your education, your experiences, and your empathy to elevate those who struggle to make their voices heard. Be an ally by giving everyone a chance to contribute and speak up for those who are being drowned out by the din of ignorance. That’s where you can do the most good. And don’t expect a thank you for it. No one is going to throw you a parade (maybe your mom and grandmother) for being decent. Just do what needs to be done because it’s the right thing to do. hyperbole

I know it’s a lot to take in, sweetie. It seems unfair and overwhelming that this burden is being placed on you, but worry not because you come from good stock. Your parents, grandparents, and I are resilient and I firmly believe you will be/are too.

And with that, I leave you with some simple truths that should carry you through the dark and the good times:

  • You are and will always be loved.
  • It’s okay to cry and be sad sometimes and you can always talk to me when you’re feeling blue.
  • Hamilton and Les Misérables are the greatest musicals of all time. Period. Don’t fight me on this.
  • Apples and peanut butter are the best combo snack ever.
  • Grades are important, but not so important that you drive yourself crazy.
  • Han shot first.
  • Sometimes the movie is better than the book. It’s rare, but it happens.
  • The Simpsons was the greatest cartoon of all time until Season 14.
  • Always be yourself. Unless you can be Batman. Then always be Batman.

 

Love,

Auntie Sammy

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Two years and four seasons, with plenty of bumps along the way, and here we are at the end of Korra’s legend. At least the part that’s animated. We’ve seen Korra grow in so many ways – as a person, a woman, and as the Avatar. From adorable prodigy to well-intentioned, though naive and hot-headed, teenager to mature adult, Korra’s journeybook four has been fraught with multiple crises. But in her persistence and resolve to prove herself Korra, and by extension her creators, have given us a story of triumph over insurmountable odds; one that embraces mature themes of class equality, spirituality, revolution, and the price paid for being guardian to an advanced world. While The Legend of Korra owes its very existence to the popularity and fantastic storytelling of Avatar: The Last Airbender, the sequel series has, in my opinion, exceeded the legacy of its predecessor, carving out its own space as an iconic piece of Western animation.

Created by Michael Dante DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko in 2012, Korra was originally a one season exploration of the world created in Avatar: The Last Airbender through the eyes of the next Avatar in the cycle, a girl from the Southern Water Tribe named Korra (Janet Varney). Had the show only run for the one season, I’m sure we would have looked at it as a fun trip back into the realm of fantasy where people bend the elements and the Avatar thwarts yet another nefarious plot in order to restore balance. The subsequent seasons, however, became the show’s proving ground. After some backtracking in season two, Korra forged ahead with an agenda that challenged the status quo of storytelling in animation and what is ostensibly viewed as “children’s programming” while still being an entertaining and engaging action-adventure fantasy series.

korra-all-the-avatarsThe Legend of Korra is a multifaceted show that defies simple categorization. Over the course of four seasons we’ve seen this work to the show’s advantage as it essentially grew up under the scrutiny of a generation steeped in internet culture. Avatar: The Last Airbender began and ended before Twitter, Tumblr, and a number of websites were in heavy rotation, but Korra was born within the epicenter of social media and the blogosphere, a place where representation and visibility were, and still are, of the utmost importance. But even with a woman of color as the lead, Korra wasn’t a guaranteed success especially in an environment where anything with a female lead was considered “tricky” or some kind of magical unicorn never to be seen twice. Two years later and the attitude of viewing audiences have towards properties like Korra has changed for the better and yet remained frustratingly the same. DiMartino and Konietzko, or Bryke as they’re affectionately called, aren’t responsible for all matters concerning representation, but they still took it upon themselves to make certain that Korra resonated with her audience despite consistent network interference. By ending the series with Korra and Asami (Seychelle Gabriel) holding hands and staring lovingly at each other as they enter the Spirit World for a much-needed vacation, The Legend of Korra solidified itself as a program indicative of its time and place. Having a queer woman of color in the lead role of a Korrasamifantasy action series put Korra in the unique position of taking a small, but still huge, step forward in the nuanced portrayal of women of color and the LGBTQ community in Western animation and children’s programming. Yes, I’m well aware that anime has been doing this for quite some time.

The uniqueness of the show also stems from a combination of storytelling and character development that, again, isn’t seen a lot in Western animation. For instance, the show follows patterns reminiscent of Joseph Campbell’s “hero’s journey”, but goes to even greater lengths to examine those tropes through the lens of Eastern storytelling. From the beginning, Korra has been a character who embraced the call to action. In fact, it was the central conceit of the pilot and the starting point for the series as a whole. Korra is a more proactive character in her approach to being the Avatar; where Aang tried to find the peaceful route first, Korra was always ready for a fight and the storytelling reflected those traits. Avatar: The Last Airbender was all about the overarching plot of Aang and friends going up against the Fire Lord while The Legend of Korra had contained arcs for each season, which allowed Korra to go up against multiple villains. The advantage for Korra lies in the character growth achieved through her battles with Amon, Unalaq and Vaatu, the Red Lotus, and Kuvira. It’s also another means of showing that the hero’s journey is hardly a linear model with a definitive beginning and end. If legend-of-korra-series-finale-korraanything, the hero’s journey is an ongoing process with multiple starts and stops along the way. The destination is still important, but the journey matters more in the long run and Korra’s journey has been all about growth and change in a world going through the same process.

As a character, Korra has an inherent connection to the struggles of the world she protects. Throughout the series her internal doubts and conflicts are reflected externally. Season one was about elitism and equality in a technologically advanced world, season two the lack of spiritual connection as a result of these advancements, season three the chaos of adjusting to rapid change, and season four the need to control in order to combat the turmoil of chaos. All of these hardships belong to Korra but they are just as present in Republic City, the four elemental nations, and in her enemies. This grounds Korra and gives her personal stakes in the fate of the world regardless of her position as the Avatar. Even if she turned away from the problems facing the world they still live within her. That’s incentive enough to act, but Korra’s peace of mind only appears to be fulfilled when she and the world are in balance.

Season four was a dense playground of themes and ideas, the most poignant being the Buddhist philosophy of suffering. At the end of season three, Korra is poisoned and nearly killed by Zaheer (Henry Rollins). She survives but is broken by the latest in a long line of battles. For three years she attempts to regain her strength and force herself into readiness, but only by accepting the trauma, and learning from her enemies, does she truly begin to heal. Suffering leads to perspective and wisdom, which ultimately allows her to triumph over Kuvira (Zelda Williams); not through the awesome power of being the Avatar but through sympathy and empathy. It was the worst kept Legend-of-Korra-The-Last-Stand-10secret that Korra and Kuvira were reflections of each other. Hell, Bolin (P.J. Byrne) practically spells it out for the audience and I’m fairly certain that the name Kuvira was chosen to be just similar enough to Korra so we wouldn’t miss it. The point being that the similarities between the two in attitude and demeanor forced Korra to go beyond her training as a fighter and find another angle of approach. While the two have some intense and amazingly animated battles thanks to Studio Mir, their conflict ends only when Korra offers a sympathetic ear, something that season one Korra wouldn’t have considered because she didn’t have the experience needed in order to understand Kuvira’s position or her plight. By resolving the situation as peaceably as possible, Korra comes into her own as the Avatar, and the person, she wants to be.

What is specific to Korra, but still a point of connection between her and the audience, is the idea of relevancy. The entire series hinges on a single question: Does the world still need the Avatar? By series end, the answer is a resounding “Yes!” All the mecha suits, spirit kaiju, and political haranguing aside, Korra is still relevant, still necessary to the world around her. But just as importantly, Korra and other shows in the same vein are needed and necessary to the viewing audience. Korra offers something we don’t see as often as we want in the television landscape: a place where women are valued.

beifong womenI’ve written before about the amazing cast of female characters in Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra, but the final season of Korra presented a plethora of women offering sage advice or kicking ass – both in Toph’s case. While Korra had plenty of male teachers and enemies, seasons three and four tipped the scale in favor of the show’s female characters. It doesn’t make Tenzin (J.K. Simmons), Mako (David Faustino), Bolin, Bumi, or Kai irrelevant, but it shows that the creators wanted to celebrate women as heroes, villains, mothers, sisters, friends, lovers, leaders, scientists, spiritual guides, and everything else under the sun. The fact that Bolin’s hero is Toph still makes me happy because it isn’t often that we see male characters on television, animated or otherwise, showing unabashed hero-worship for a female character. Bolin, more than any male character in the series, has been the ultimate cheerleader for women. He’s the first to believe in Korra, laying out all of the qualities that make her amazing, he worships Toph, and he defends Kuvira’s cause because he wants to see the good in it before the reality of his situation sets in. Through Bolin, Bryke found their own surrogate to tell the male audience that the Avatar universe is a world of celebration for women and men. Yes, it’s a realm of fantasy, but fantasy has a way of influencing reality.Bolin and Mako

Is it a feminist agenda? Of course, but the seeds have been there since Avatar. Making the next Avatar a woman as well as the reveal that the Avatar is a literal avatar for Raava, the female spirit of light and peace, are choices on the part of the creators to enrich their world as they see fit. By emphasizing the importance of the feminine spirit alongside the extensive female cast, DiMartino and Konietzko have crafted a realm where girls and women are equal in every way. The Legend of Korra accomplishes this without ever having to explicitly state the obvious in-universe compared to the first season of Avatar that went a long way to get the point across that women could fight just as well as men. The women of Korra are, without question, active agents in their world. Youngsters like Ikki and Jinora make just as much impact as the older Lin (Mindy Sterling) and Suyin (Anne Heche) Beifong. Age doesn’t denote skill or importance, giving girls of all ages in the viewing audience a contrasting image of how to define their own value and self-worth as they grow up.

So what’s next for Korra? Not sure. Hopefully a comic book is in the works a la the continuing adventures of Avatar: The Last Airbender that bridged the two series. After the series finale and the ending that will definitely be talked about for some time, it’s clear that there’s plenty of unexplored territory to cover. As Korra says to Tenzin, she’s not done learning. But if this is the last we see of Korra and company, then it’s definitely a legend worth telling.

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