Posts Tagged ‘Chris Pratt’

One trailer shy of a Furious 7 joke. Sigh.

I know a lot of people are concerned that the bubble’s going to burst on movies geared towards those of the geekier sort. If, however, the quality of the six movies whose trailers dropped within the last two weeks is any indication of their quality, then I think we’re good, where movies are concerned, for the next couple years. The last four days alone have seen most of those trailers released into the murky atmosphere of the internet, so I thought I’d go ahead and give you my thoughts on these films based on the most recent and previous trailers.large_trailer

Spoiler alert: I plan to see all of these films. I may have reservations about a few, some more than others, but I’m also the type of person who likes to experience the entire movie before I decide whether it’s the new love of my life, the biggest assault on the senses since Batman & Robin, or a disposable piece of fluff.

I’m just that type of girl. Go figure. Anywho, on to the trailers.

Second spoiler warning: The Terminator Genisys trailer gives away the biggest twist of the movie, so if you’ve managed to avoid it and want to remain in the dark I’d recommend scrolling down really, really fast and move on to the next trailer at a furious pace!

Jurassic World – June 12, 2015

Since the first trailer dropped I’ve been on board with the concept of Jurassic World as the logical extension of the original Jurassic Park (1993). Park and World share the same themes of scientific and corporate hubris with World upping the ante as the genetically modified dinosaur created to boost attendance wreaks havoc on the park. Previous trailers and clips have shown the movie will definitely be calling back to some of the more well-known moments in the first film while sticking to the tried and true formula of monster movie scares, dinosaur fights, and possibly some philosophical discussion about blah, blah, blah and oh my God Chris Pratt on a motorcycle riding with his velociraptor hunting pack! Ahem. Sorry, what was I talking about? Anyway, at the very least the movie promises to at least be visually stunning with each park attraction having a very Disney-esque immersion happening. And I know this is wishful thinking, but if there’s any chance Jeff Goldblum’s Ian Malcolm could make a for real cameo, I’d consider this movie a win.

Terminator Genisys – July 1, 2015

Yeah, I’m not sure why a trailer was made that gives away what would arguably be the biggest mind-blowing moment in the movie, but there ya go. Either the filmmakers and the production company really think Arnold Schwarzenegger’s return to the franchise will put butts in seats just because or they’re really worried no one will see this movie because the last two installments didn’t do them any favors. To be fair, the premise is intriguing. With all the time travel that goes on in the myopic missions of machines trying desperately to eliminate one dude from the timeline, the idea of alternate timelines and what if scenarios actually makes sense. Of course, the type of time travel setup in the Terminator movies requires time to be linear otherwise John Connor’s future would keep changing. There’s also the notion of fate and fixed points in time because the machines keep sending assassins to kill John and his mother and yet they never succeed. But I’ve already put too much thought into this movie. Sorry, time travel as a narrative device is one of those things I obsessively pick apart. But hey, Emilia Clarke looks like a rad young Sarah Connor!

Ant-Man – July 17, 2015

I like the trailers for this movie more and more. Yes, it’s disappointing that Janet Van Dyne, a founding member of the Avengers has been all but written out of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but here’s hoping that Evangeline Lilly’s Hope Van Dyne will become the Wasp and give Ant-Man a run for his money! After the teaser trailer left something to be desired based on the performance of previous Marvel trailers, this one definitely makes up for it in every way possible. Better jokes showing off Paul Rudd’s endless charm as thief turned hero, Scott Lang, and a nice hero turned mentor dynamic set up between Lang and Michael Douglas’ older Hank Pym. Since Hank was also a founding member of the Avengers in the comics, it’ll be interesting to see how they incorporate the Ant-Man origins into a world where superheroes have only been a recent thing. Plus, I’m really digging the effects as Ant-Man and Yellowjacket shrink and grow during their fights. Even though the climactic battle will occur in Scott’s daughter’s room among her toys, director Peyton Reed promises there’s much more to it than just a cute shot of an epic battle on a Thomas the Tank Engine.

Fantastic Four – August 7, 2015

The Fantastic Four…with powers! Much better, 20th Century Fox. Like Ant-Man, the Fantastic Four teaser trailer didn’t exactly wow anyone, but this trailer feels like we’re getting a better idea of what the movie will actually be about. Yes, the premise for Marvel’s first family has always been a bit hokey, but there’s plenty to work with as the crux of the movie will center on Reed Richard’s genius that leads to the discovery of another dimension and ultimately changes him and his friends into superpowered heroes. Oh, and Doctor Doom is there too. Doooooom! Reed’s sense of responsibility and his guilt are a huge driving force behind the character so I’m interested in seeing how this will play out in the movie. Crucial to this is the friendship between Reed and Ben Grimm, so hopefully the dynamic between Miles Teller and Jamie Bell has some meat to it. Otherwise we’re just looking at four strangers who happen to get cosmic powers, live together and have their lives taped. Like a superhero Real World. So, yeah, I like what I see from director Josh Trank so far. The effects look amazing and there was actually some humor. Thumbs up for now!

Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens – December 18, 2015

As someone who only looks at Star Wars through the movies (I know, I know Clone Wars and Rebels are part of the canon), I held out a lot of hope for Episode VII after being terribly disappointed by the prequels. Thankfully, it looks like J.J. Abrams will be doing right by the franchise because I love every friggin’ second of this trailer. The opening shot of the Star Destroyer is gorgeous and Luke’s narration made all the goosebumps happen. Do I really need to explain how awesome that final shot was? Do I? It’s Han and Chewie, for cryin’ out loud! This looks like the movie we’ve been waiting for as the older generation gets ready to pass the baton down to the next. How John Boyega, Daisy Ridley, and Oscar Isaac’s characters factor into the universe post-Return of the Jedi still remains unclear, but that’s part of the fun. If all I have going into this movie are the ridiculously awesome visuals, then I’m still going in content with my ignorance of the plot. I want to be surprised by this movie and fall in love with Star Wars all over again.

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – March 25, 2016

Okay, not gonna lie, I’ve been down on the burgeoning DC Cinematic Universe for a while. Not because I dislike DC Comics, quite the opposite. I’ve been a DC fan since before I can remember, but Man of Steel was so underwhelming – for me – that it’s going to take a lot to change my mind about what this franchise can offer. At the very least, Batman v Superman holds promise. It won’t be out for another year, but I’m hoping Chris Terrio’s script tackles the rivalry and eventual friendship of Bats and Supes in a way that at least makes sense despite borrowing heavily from Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns wherein their decades long friendship falls apart. Throw in a dizzying amount of cameos from other DC heroes and it’s quite the ambitious start on the road to Justice League. The religious connotations are, of course, present. Looks like Zack Snyder will be following up on the destruction of Metropolis and what it means to have a superpowered “savior” among us. Supes and religion isn’t new territory and Snyder isn’t shying away from the obvious symbolism, so hopefully the script handles it with some subtlety…please? Other than that, Henry Cavill still looks great as Superman and Ben Affleck looks good for the few seconds we get of him as Bruce Wayne and Batman. I’m pretty sure people will be griping about the “Batman gravel” in his voice, but those things don’t bother me. I just want to be able to walk out of a theater next March pumping my fist in the air and shouting “Yeah, Bats and Supes!”

So those are the most recent trailers. What did you guys think? Which movies are you the most excited for and does the trailer factor into that excitement?

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This year marked the 30th anniversary of Ghostbusters, which first premiered on June 1, 1984. Strangely enough, this is also the year that’s seen the most traction on the much rumored, only dreamed about, and highly divisive continuation of the 212992-ghostbustersfranchise. While many fans of Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II, have longed for a third installment in the supernatural undertakings of New York’s finest paranormal experts, getting the movie off the ground has been a long and arduous process. The biggest hurdle in getting a third film made was the apparent lack of interest on the part of co-stars Bill Murray and Harold Ramis as well as director Ivan Reitman. Considering the cast and crew were essentially pressured into making the sequel by Columbia Pictures in 1989, it’s not surprising that there would be some hesitancy in making a third.

Plans to revive the franchise have been bandied about for over two decades with interest waxing and waning depending on popular trends in Hollywood and the state of the film industry itself. The project appeared to be moving forward in 2010 when Reitman announced he’d be directing and that Murray, Ramis, and Aykroyd would make cameos in order to pass on the torch to the next generation of Ghostbusters. The death of Harold Ramis in February of this year, however, followed by Reitman dropping out of directing a month later seemed to be the last straw for the franchise. With the need for nostalgia-fueled movies running high, was a third film even worth attempting if Ramis was gone, Murray a probable no-show, and Reitman backing off to produce rather than direct?

ghostbusters3The fact that Ghostbusters III is now a highly anticipated reality speaks to the franchise’s viability. With Reitman taking a back seat as the director, it was announced in October that Paul Feig would take over those duties, adding that he intended to make the next movie about an all-female team of Ghostbusters with screenwriter Katie Dippold. Neither Feig nor Dippold are strangers to projects with hilarious women – the two worked together on the buddy cop comedy The Heat (2013) starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. Prior to that Feig gained critical acclaim with Bridesmaids (2011), featuring an all-female cast of comedic actresses, while Dippold cut her writing chops on MADtv and Parks and Recreation. Their comedic backgrounds in sketch, improv, film, and television make them highly qualified to take over the reins of a huge comedic franchise that includes cartoons, video games, and comic books.

The only sticking point is Feig and Dippold’s plan to turn Ghostbusters III into a hard reboot, starting from scratch instead of building off of the first two films. Feig told Entertainment Weekly:PaulFeig_KatieDippold-585x424

I had lunch with [Sony Pictures co-chairman] Amy Pascal when I got back to town. She was just saying, gosh, nobody wants to do this. I said, yeah, it’s really hard to take that on, especially since it’s 25 years later. how do you come back into a world that’s had these ghosts and all this? It just felt too difficult. How do you do it and not screw it up? But then it was bugging me for the next few days because Ghostbusters is such a great thing and everybody knows it, and it’s such a great world. It’s a shame to just let this thing sit there. I want to see another one. My favorite thing to do is work with funny women. I was like, what if it was an all female cast? If they were all women?  Suddenly, my mind kind of exploded: that would be really fun. And then I thought, well, what if we just make it new? It’s not coming into the world that existed before. It’s always hard if the world has gone through this big ghost attack, how do you do it again? I wanted to come into our world where there’s talk of ghosts but they’re not really credible, and so what would happen in our world if this happened today?

 

gb33-ghostbusters-3-dream-cast-kristen-wiig-and-emma-stoneThere are pros and cons to this approach. On the one hand, I can totally see why rebooting the property and starting from scratch works to Feig and Dippold’s advantage. If the movie functions as it’s own thing, removed from the previous films, then it gives them the ability to establish their own rules as to how the paranormal works in a modern day setting. It also sets a new tone for possible sequels going forward that would allow them to do more world-building, making the movies as funny and scary as they want without having to stay true to what came before. Their Ghostbusters would be “spiritual” successors to Reitman’s in that the general premise would remain the same while giving them the freedom to branch out with their own brand of Ghostbusters.

On the other hand, Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II never concretely established the mechanics of the paranormal, so it would still be possible for Feig and Dippold to establish their new team of Ghostbusters while building off of the first two films. Yes, the tone of Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II was mostly lighthearted fun with a few freaky moments, but in the thirty years since Gozer tried to destroy the world and Vigo tried to possess a baby, there’s plenty of room to explore how the world has adjusted to ghosts being a thing and whether or not the Ghostbusters have thrived or faltered.

That’s why I feel like there’s more potential in at least keeping the next Ghostbusters film in the same reality as the first and second. One of the charms of the first film was the idea of treating ghosts like vermin, something that needed to be exterminated with the Ghostbusters taking on the role of blue collar working stiffs who just happen to take them out with highly unstable proton packs. The simplicity of the premise is how easy it would be to introduce new characters into the world.

For the sake of argument, let’s say that the Ghostbusters, in-universe, have expanded their business to other cities outside of New York, recruiting young, eager scientists, engineers, and your typical blue collar types in the same vein as police and fire departments. Depending on your team, there are plenty of ways to introduce the new characters. If Peter Venkman had a local tv show in New York, it’s not out of the question that one of the new Ghostbusters, or all of them, watched his show as children. cartoon ghostbustersRay owned a bookstore, so someone could have been a former employee. Maybe others took classes from Egon in college. Hell, Winston could have taken over the business himself, acting like the beleaguered captain to a bunch of newbie Ghostbusters. Or it could simply be a case of having characters who want to bag ghosts. Look at the plethora of “ghost hunting” reality tv shows; the paranormal is of definite interest to the viewing public and I could see a Ghostbusters parody of those reality shows, only this time the ghosts are proven to be real and the ‘Busters are cashing in on the trend.

Of course, the same parody could occur in a universe where the Ghostbusters are reintroduced via reboot. While trying to be “ghost hunters” a la the tv shows, a group of female scientists and enthusiasts discover real ghosts, which leads them down the path to becoming Ghostbusters. So, yes, it’s possible for in-universe and new universe explanations, but I still like the idea of one of the new Busters being such a fangirl for Venkman’s show that she went into paranormal studies because of him.

Ghostbusters is a franchise made to be updated as new teams are introduced. Dan Aykroyd definitely sees the same potential in the franchise, telling Dennis Miller on The Dennis Miller Show in 2011 that:

What we have to remember is that ‘Ghostbusters’ is bigger than any one component…The concept is much larger than any individual role and the promise of Ghostbusters III is that we get to hand the equipment and the franchise down to new blood.

enhanced-30907-1410210614-1The “new blood” in question may be actresses like Kristin Wiig, Emma Stone, Melissa McCarthy, Lizzy Caplan, Jennifer Lawrence, and Amy Schumer. But the recently leaked emails from Sony reveals another possible spin-off starring Channing Tatum and Chris Pratt, with the Russo brothers (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) producing, that could turn the Ghostbusters franchise into a multi-movie spanning universe where various teams from around the country, or the world, join together to defeat a major threat.

Yes, I know it’s wishful thinking, but in the post-Avengers world of movie making, I guarantee you the thought has crossed the mind of at least one executive at Sony. Anything that can be turned into a franchise of movies with tie-in comics, tv shows, and toy lines is ripe for the picking. So, yeah, DREAM BIG! And much like J.J. Abrams taking on Star Wars VII, Ghostbusters will be in the hands of a director and writer intent on honoring what came before while still pushing forward. There’s also a whole generation of actors who are passionate about being involved in the project because they grew up with the movies. As daunting as the task is to “get it right”, it’s also not about reinventing the wheel. Ghostbusters lends itself to finding new angles of storytelling within a familiar setting. All you need is a team, cool gadgets, some humor, and a lot of ghosts!

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But what are your thoughts on Ghostbusters III? Should they work within the already established universe or branch out on their own? Who would be your dream team of female Ghostbusters?

Meet-The-Guardians-of-the-Galaxy

Even by comic book standards Guardians of the Galaxy is an obscure property. Not that Iron Man, Thor, or Captain America were household names like Superman, Batman, or Wonder Woman, but at least people were somewhat aware of the characters whether through comics, cartoons, or embarrassing early 90s movies. Hulk was probably the most well-known amongst the Avengers and even he suffered through two middling movies. Given the success of The Avengers, Marvel could’ve easily picked any number of heroes to launch within their Phase 2, so why Guardians of the Galaxy? Why take the risk on a group no one, not even some die-hard Marvel readers, was aware of with a cast of characters that included a gun-toting raccoon and a sentient tree with a limited vocabulary? I could give you a long explanation about how Guardians fits into the overall mega-event Marvel’s leading towards with Thanos and the Infinity Gauntlet storyline from the comics, but in simplistic terms? They could, so they did.

Okay, yes, there’s more to it than that but from the get-go there’s been an attitude surrounding Guardians of the Galaxy, one of “Yeah, Guardians of the Galaxy. Trust us. We got this.” And as moviegoers, we collectively consented to the idea. Marvel had earned enough goodwill that we believed in their vision. The result is yet another blockbuster to keep Marvel on its unprecedented streak of solidly entertaining superhero movies. No two Marvel movies have been entirely alike save for a through line of tone and world building. Thor took us into the realm of fantasy, Captain America gave us a World War 2 era film as well as an action-packed spy thriller, and The Avengers gave us the ultimate team-up. Guardians, however, is straight sci-fi adventure that expands the Marvel Cinematic Universe across the galaxy. Director James Gunn infuses Guardians with his snarky, rebellious attitude coming out of his experience with indie and Troma films, but also rises to the challenge of delivering his first big budget, special effects laden homage to the sci-fi genre.

guardians-of-the-galaxy-posterPeter Quill (Chris Pratt), aka Star-Lord, having spent most of his life in space after being abducted from Earth in 1988, unknowingly stumbles upon a highly valued orb that contains one of the infamous infinity stones. Seeking the orb is Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace) who sends Gamora (Zoe Saldana), the adopted daughter of Thanos (Josh Brolin), to retrieve the orb so that Ronan can get revenge on the planet Xandar despite a peace treaty between Xandar, home to the Nova Corps, and Ronan’s people, the Kree. Quill is also pursued by bounty hunters Rocket (voice of Bradley Cooper) and Groot (voice of Vin Diesel) after his boss Yondu (Michael Rooker) puts a price on his head for going rogue. When the four end up in prison, they gain another ally in Drax the Destroyer (Dave Bautista), who seeks revenge on Ronan for the death of his family. Seeing that they share a common enemy, and a desire to continue living, the five band together to thwart Ronan and save the galaxy.

From the moment the first trailer dropped and the first poster circulated around the internet, the marketing campaign for Guardians was unabashedly cocky in its presentation of a team formed from a rag-tag group of outlaws, assassins, thieves, and thugs. It was a choice reflective not just of James Gunn’s style but also the journey towards heroism made by the team. The Guardians aren’t necessarily brought together through nobility of purpose. They’re outcasts, misfits, and loners. They’ve all suffered loss because of the hand dealt to them by the universe, but in finding each other they have a reason to care about something bigger than themselves. Gunn and his co-writer, Nicole Perlman, manage to get this across via cinematic tribute; starting the film with Star-Lord, alone on a planet, retrieving an artifact a la Raiders of the Lost Ark and progressing the narrative the through a visual spectacle invoking Star Wars until the team is truly formed in a shot straight-up lifted from The Right Stuff. Through it all the movie maintains a lighthearted tone, but isn’t afraid to go for the gut-wrenching darkness needed to delve into the backstories of the main characters. It’s the humor, however, that sustains the movie. That and a soundtrack that acts as a time capsule of 60s and 70s pop music sure to make even the surliest fanboy tap his feet. Hell, I’ve had just about every song stuck in my head for days after seeing the film.Guardians-of-the-Galaxy-Rocket-Raccoon

For an ensemble piece like this you couldn’t ask for a better cast. Pratt truly solidifies his status as a leading man, channeling every roguish character imaginable into a ball of charm and overconfidence that would make Han Solo nod in approval. Saldana makes being a deadly assassin look easy; kicking ass and taking names without breaking a sweat, yet still managing to exude some of Gamora’s vulnerability despite the cold exterior. Bautista is surprisingly good as Drax. I don’t know anything about his career as a wrestler, but whatever limited acting skills he has never made it on-screen. Drax’s inability to understand metaphors actually worked to Bautista’s advantage, giving him some of the funnier lines in the film. And though they weren’t present for filming, Bradley Cooper and Vin Diesel turn in wonderfully nuanced performances as Rocket and Groot respectively. These were the two characters everyone worried about in terms of audience acceptance, but the special effects team knocked it out of the park with the two bounty hunters. They were textured and expressive, making us believe, from the moment we see them, that they belong in this world. Cooper’s Rocket is a damaged soul, the only one of his kind and his rage and sorrow are played straight during several unexpected moments. But he’s right up there going snark for snark with Quill. Rocket easily steals the movie with his one-liners and overall awesomeness. Oddly enough, Diesel delivers as Groot. He only has three words to work with, but Diesel manages to make each reading different, showing that inflection, spacing, and emotion can make three words seem like a paragraph.

Star-LordAs an ensemble, the Guardians are the epitome of a Marvel family. Their clashing personalities work off each other as they fight and bicker over just about everything. Scenes between just the five characters are the strongest in the film. The timing is perfect and Gunn seems to take great delight in throwing the typical clichés in our faces with a well placed one-liner. The main characters are bolstered by a strong supporting cast including Glenn Close, John C. Reilly , Peter Serafinowicz, Djimon Hounsou, Karen Gillan, Benicio Del Toro, Michael Rooker, and cameos from Nathan Fillion, Rob Zombie, Seth Green, and Troma director/producer Lloyd Kaufman. Gunn even includes a nice little role for his brother, Sean Gunn, who was the body actor for Rocket during filming. It’s an amazing cadre of actors assembled and shows the pull Gunn and Marvel has for getting quality talent. Even the smallest roles could potentially lead to bigger things in the future.

So with all the praise I’ve been doling out, there are a few problems that most Marvel movie aficionados will see unfold. For one, Ronan the Accuser’s motivation is about as surface level as any Marvel villain. He wants to destroy Xandar because EVIL! and that’s as far as it really goes for him. His myopic goal ultimately aids the Guardians in stopping him because he does little else to prove himself as a formidable villain other than throw Drax around and yell at Thanos. Maybe if we’d seen him destroy a planet that wasn’t Xandar to show exactly how powerful he’s become with the infinity stone and the failed attempt to stop him by the Guardians. Their failure than motivates them to make sure Xandar doesn’t meet the same fate. Something like that. It doesn’t help that the complex backstories of each character only get brief enough mentionsRonan-the-Accuser-in-Guardians-of-the-Galaxy for the needs of exposition. Quill has the biggest arc of the movie in order to ground the audience, but it means Gamora, Drax, Rocket, and Groot’s stories need to be put on the back burner. To the movie’s credit, though, they give us just enough background to give certain scenes the proper emotional weight. Rocket’s drunken outburst about being a monster feels genuine given what we’ve seen and know about him and Gamora’s anger at Thanos for being turned into an assassin is palpable.

Overall, the movie is well paced but there are times where it feels like scenes were inexplicably cut that were needed to make the transitions within the story smoother. Characters just happen to have vital information or show up at the right time out of plot convenience rather than a more organic flow. Yondu and the Ravagers happen to end up on Knowhere at the same time as things go awry with The Collector and Ronan shows up upon Drax’s drunken request because…reasons? It serves the purpose of making the stakes higher and giving us a kickass chase sequence, but how we arrive from point A to point B is a bit hazy. The fight between Gamora and Nebula (Karen Gillan) also exemplifies the need for better characterization and editing. The whole sequence feels like it was supposed to be longer – the trailers at least indicated this was so – since Gamora and Nebula’s sibling rivalry drives the savagery of the fight. Guardians-of-the-Galaxy-GamoraUnfortunately the editing makes it much shorter, which could also be the result of underutilizing Nebula as a character. Though she appears badass and definitely carries plenty of attitude, Nebula becomes more of an obstacle for Gamora and their fight lacks the emotional impact it should between the “daughters” of Thanos. Hopefully there’s a director’s cut that will get released because I’d love to see what Gunn’s complete vision was for the movie.

The problems, however, shouldn’t dissuade you from seeing the film. Like I said, they’re typical of Marvel movies, but there’s definitely an opening for further characterization and storytelling now that the team/family has been formed. If anything, Guardians of the Galaxy shows how a team-up movie can be made without the building block process of individual films Marvel has relied upon in the past. Not only does this open up more possibilities for other Marvel movies, but shines a light of hope on certain other comic book team movies coming out in a couple of years.

Until then, go see Guardians of the Galaxy. I’m more than twelve percent certain you’ll enjoy it.