Posts Tagged ‘Aquaman’

 

 

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Okay, looks like Warner Bros. and DC Comics finally decided to show their hand. While many a DC fan has had to put on a brave face and confidently reassure others that the DC Cinematic Universe will eventually catch up to Marvel, even with the 8-year head start, there’s often a bit of hesitation. DC’s Cinematic foundation started on shaky ground among fans with the divisive Man of Steel and the ever-growing cast of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice still has us scratching our heads over the nature of all the reported cameos. Instead of building their world, Warner Bros. and DC looked like they were trying their damnedest to throw every hero in the DC Universe into one film, reversing Marvel’s formula of solo movies leading to a team up film. It also didn’t help that WB pushed back the release of Dawn of Justice to May of 2016 only to push it up to March in order to avoid direct box office conflict with Captain America 3. And even though WB/DC claimed to have nine movies lined up through 2020, Marvel still trumped them with films scheduled for release through 2028.

Yesterday, however, WB/DC, after sporadic announcements about their films including the casting of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as Black Adam for the upcoming Shazam movie, finally gave us a map of their cinematic universe through 2020.

 

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Obviously most of these films aren’t surprising. We’ve known about Justice League and Shazam for a while and Suicide Squad was only recently announced. The most surprising part of this lineup is the splitting up of Justice League into two films, something we’ve only seen with the final movies of book adaptation series, and their placement in the order; part one will follow the Wonder Woman solo movie with part two released two years later after solo movies for the Flash, Aquaman, and Shazam. It’s an odd thing to do when one would logically assume the two films would be one continuous story. Breaking them up with three solo films, presumably origin stories, in the middle seems like a bit of a gamble. Of course, the two Justice League movies could technically be standalone movies with the second part acting as an extension of the finished story from part one with the films sandwiched between adding to the build up. Or they could be a bunch of solo origin stories with no connection to the Justice League narrative. Either scenario is likely until plot details are confirmed – the Schrödinger’s cat of fan speculation, if you will.

Oh, and before I forget…

Ahem!1280-wonder-woman-610x343

OHMYGODWE’REGETTINGAWONDERWOMANSOLOMOVIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Okay, Sam, calm down. Deep breaths. In and out. There we go. Now…continue.

So, yeah, we’re actually going to get a Wonder Woman solo film before Justice League! The assumption is it will be some sort of origin story since producer Charles Roven recently let slip that her backstory would be more in line with the New 52 comics where Diana learns she’s a demigod, the daughter of Hippolyta and Zeus. The solo movie could potentially piggyback off of Diana/Wonder Woman’s cameo (however large the role is) in Batman v Superman, telling her origin in its entirety for the cinematic universe. Or the film could go with what seems to be the most popular narrative structure of WB/DC, non-linear storytelling with more flashbacks than you can shake a stick at. One can only hope that the creative team selected for the project has something better up their sleeve. And, sorry Marvel, but looks like DC’s beating you to the female superhero solo movie. Better get cracking on a Black Widow or a Ms. Marvel/Captain Marvel movie STAT.

ezra-flashThe announcement also confirmed the casting of Jason Momoa as Arthur Curry/Aquaman and Ezra Miller as Barry Allen/The Flash. Momoa’s rumored attachment to playing Aquaman has been around for so long I think we’re all breathing easier now that the cat’s finally out of the bag. The casting of Miller as Barry Allen is definitely an interesting one. While Grant Gustin embodies aspects of the Silver Age Barry, in personality and looks, on television, Miller’s casting appears to be more on point with Zack Snyder’s atypical casting decisions. With the myriad casting rumors going around about every other character, Flash seemed to be one of the furthest from our minds. Though now that Miller is confirmed for the role, I’m genuinely interested to see what he brings to Barry on the big screen.

Momoa’s casting is easily the most inspired choice and yet he’s the most radical departure from his comic book counterpart. Arthur Curry, in the comics, has been Whitey McBlonderson since his inception, but putting Momoa, a man of Pacific Islander heritage, in the role feels almost like a “well duh!” moment of realization. Not only does it further diversify the cast, but it shows that the casting director, Snyder, and hopefully some of the producers are thinking more about what works for the character rather than strictly adhering to the comics. Perhaps Momoa’s casting could affect the comics should he prove likeable enough to audiences. Jason Momoa Aquaman

I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t pumped for the future of comic book movies. In my world, there isn’t a war between Marvel and DC movies. I get to watch all of them, so how could I possibly lose? Okay, there are ways I could lose, but right now I need to live in my delusions of a well crafted universe for the DC Comics characters I love. There are a few things worth noting, though. One, the list doesn’t include planned solo movies for Batman and Superman, which WB is totally gonna do because do I really need to explain it to you? Two, Guillermo Del Toro’s Justice League Dark and Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Sandman movies are still in the wings for the time being. Whether WB plans to add them to the lineup or keep them in development hell remains to be seen.

Oh and apparently Green Lantern is getting rebooted. So…Hal Jordan again or can we just skip over to John Stewart?

I’m not the biggest fan of variant covers, at least not ones that are purposefully used so the publishers can up the price on a comic by delving into the portion of our lizard brains that has a desire for collecting and hoarding EVERYTHING that ever existed of the thing we love most. In this case, it’s not unusual for readers to spend an awful lot of money getting variant covers for books they wouldn’t normally read because the artwork or the subject matter speaks to them.

I’ve been pretty lucky to not fall into that sinkhole…until now.DC-Trinity-Darwyn-Cooke

In December, DC Comics will release their books with variant covers by none other than Darwyn Cooke. The master writer and artist behind books like the Harvey, Eisner, and Shuster award-winning DC: The New Frontier, Batman: Ego and Other Tales, Catwoman, The Spirit, the graphic novel adaptations of Richard Stark’s Parker series, and a storyboard artist for Batman: The Animated Series, Superman: The Animated Series, and the opening animation for Batman Beyond, Cooke is most well-known for his signature retro style of art that harkens back to the Golden and Silver Ages of comics. He puts the “mod” is modern is what I’m saying. Cooke also has a way with composition and color. He frequently uses black but he’s not shy about using bright, bold colors to set the tone of a scene. Cooke creates worlds where dark subject matters can exist in the light and vice versa. There’s also a hopeful, inspirational quality to the way he draws his subjects, especially the characters of DC Comics.

Full confession, I didn’t start reading comics until I was in college. The first book I read was DC: The New Frontier and it remains my favorite book to reread or revisit over and over again. As a history major, it’s a beautiful time capsule of the changing society and politics from the 40s to the 60s, and as a comic book fan it’s an obvious love letter from a man to the heroes of his childhood who also went through huge transitions from the Golden to the Silver ages. Cooke makes the heroes of DC relevant by sticking them right in the middle of political and social uprisings, imagining and bringing to life how a world full of superheroes would deal with matters like racism, the Red Scare, and the Space Race. Plus, dinosaurs, and ancient alien monoliths. Though the animated adaptation, Justice League: The New Frontier, captures some of the same magic, it barely scratches the surface of what’s on the page, which shows how vital Cooke is as both an artist and a writer. He makes the heroes of DC look and act heroic without sacrificing their integrity or stooping to the lowest common denominator of storytelling.

So, to make a long story short (too late!), DC finally done good in featuring Cooke’s art on 23 of their titles in December. Luckily, if you’re not all that keen on spending a lot of money on variant covers so you can buy your family the holiday gifts they always wanted, all of the variants have been released online on various websites like Comic Vine, Comics Alliance, Comic Book Resources, Hit Fix, and Newsarama. And what kind of Cooke fanatic would I be if I didn’t show you pretty much all of them?

For my money’s worth, any time Cooke draws the trinity of Wonder Woman, Batman, and Superman is fine by me. Hell, I wish they’d just give Cooke an ongoing title at DC to do whatever he wanted: one-shots, ongoings, minis, I don’t care. But I must confess to having a soft spot for Catwoman whenever Cooke draws her. It was his redesign that took Selina out of the overly dramatic costumes and put her in a more practical, yet stylish catsuit (pun more than likely intended). One thing you’ll notice about most of the variants is that the characters appear to be happy, an emotion that’s been sorely missed in the DC Universe right now. God forbid the heroes crack a smile but, in Cooke’s version of the DCU, heroes are stoked to be saving lives, flying through space, and even being chased by cops with bullets flying at them.

Which one is your favorite?

 

Action Comics

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Aquaman

Aquaman

Batgirl

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Batman and Robin

Batman and Robin

Batman/Superman

Batman/Superman

Catwoman

Catwoman

The Flash

The Flash

Grayson

Grayson

Green Lantern Corp

Green Lantern Corp

Green Lantern

Green Lantern

Justice League

Justice League

Justice League United

Justice League United

Sinestro

Sinestro

Supergirl

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Superman

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Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

While I certainly feel more informed about the plethora of lake monsters that appear to inhabit my country, I’ve got to ask one question: Why hasn’t Aquaman done anything about this? I know most of the planet is water, but you’d think the guy could take some time out of his busy day fighting over the throne of Atlantis and take down a Nessie or two. I mean, Jeez, Aquaman, way to drop the ball on this nation’s lake monster problem! Maybe Lex Luthor can do something about it.

Lake Monsters

Source: Cryptomundo

Nick CardyIt’s my sad duty to report that yesterday, November 3rd, Nick Cardy, a renowned and respected artist in the comic book industry passed away at the age of 93. Cardy was best known for his work at DC Comics during the Silver Age, bringing well-known characters like Aquaman and the first incarnation of the Teen Titans to life in their solo books.

Born Nicholas Viscardi, shortening it to Nick Viscardi in his early career, Cardy got his start in the industry working for Will Eisner and Jerry Iger’s comic packaging company, Eisner & Iger, at the age of 18, drawing for various titles like Fight Comics, Jungle Comics, and Kaanga Comics. Eisner even had him take over as writer and artist for the popular comic strip “Lady Luck” in Eisner’s own Sunday supplement comic, “The Spirit Section”, from May of 1941 to February of 1942. On “Lady Luck”, Cardy worked under the house pseudonym of Ford Davis, the one used by Eisner, the character’s original creator, but always found a way to get his initials, NV, into the story. It wasn’t until he worked on “Quicksilver” for the National Comics series that he’d shorten his name completely to Nick Cardy.

A veteran of World War II, Cardy served from 1943 to 1945, earning two Purple Hearts. Serving in the 66th Infantry Division, he entered a contest to design his company’s patch, winning with a black panther logo. It was because of his talent as an artist that he was moved to division headquarter after a general recognized Cardy’s work from a magazine. Eventually he was assigned to the Third Armored Division as an assistant tank driver in the European theater, ending his time in the war in the Army’s Information and Education Office in France.

Artist At WarUpon returning to civilian life, Cardy drew for several magazines and comic strips, eventually landing his first gig for DC Comics in 1950 on the title Gang Busters, based on the popular radio show. He later developed his first title, Tomahawk, about an American colonial soldier dressing as an Iroquois warrior to fight the British during The American Revolution. As far as DC Comic’s more recognizable characters go, Cardy was the primary artist for the first 39 issues of Aquaman’s solo book from 1962-1968, though he would continue drawing covers for the title until 1971. He was also brought on board as the artist on the Teen Titan’s solo book in 1966, though he’d previously drawn the Titans, consisting of Robin (Dick Grayson), Aqualad, Kid Flash (Wally West), and Wonder Girl, in their first appearance as a team in Brave and the Bold #60. He would go on to draw interiors for Justice League of America, Superman, Detective Comics, House of Mystery, Action Comics, and All-Star Western, featuring one of my personal favorite characters, Bat Lash. Cardy remained DC’s go-to cover artist until he left the industry in the late 1970s.

After leaving the industry, he became a successful commercial artist, doing magazine and ad illustrations, including some movie posters for The Street Fighter (1974), California Suite (1978), and Apocalypse Now (1979).

So, in honor of Nick Cardy, who is now floating amidst a spiral galaxy, directing the swirls to his liking, I’d like to offer this selection of his vast body of work for you to enjoy.

Aquaman-CardyBat Lash - Cardy

Lady LuckQuicksilver - National Comics

Teen Titans - CardyTeen Titans Wonder Girl - Cardy

The SpectreThe Witching Hour

Mess Line

Cologne Germany Cardy