Posts Tagged ‘animation’

 

Sam and Tiff talk about everything and nothing as friends are want to do.

 

Bill-and-Ted-s-Excellent

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Sam is joined by her friends Sean and Cara to talk with Phil LaMarr and boy does it get nerdy! Phil is the nerd’s nerd, the geek’s geek and the group get into animation, Star Wars, comic books, Lord of the Rings, and other topics!

Phil LaMarr

Website: http://www.phillamarr.com
Twitter: @phillamarr

Intro music: “French Kiss” by Mrs. Howl
http://mrshowl.bandcamp.com/
http://www.reverbnation.com/mrshowl

Sam has a pleasantly giddy conversation with Claire Hummel. The two talk about Disney, historical costuming, and then pretty much geek out over animation.

Links to Claire:

Website

deviantArt

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Twitter

Into music: “French Kiss” by Mrs. Howl

Sam goes one-on-one with Andy Suriano, artist and sometimes writer for the Samurai Jack comic book. Andy was also the concept and storyboard artist for Samurai Jack the cartoon and has worked on a number of other animated programs like Sym-Bionic Titan and the current TMNT cartoon for Nickelodeon.

Over the last week fans of the accordion-wielding, Polka-powered musical god of parody that isweird-al-yankovic-mandatory-fun-album-cover “Weird Al” Yankovic were treated to the release of eight new music videos, one video per day, in celebration of Yankovic’s 14th studio album, Mandatory Fun. The videos debuted on different outlets across the internet and showed that Weird Al is still the king of musical comedy as his parodies and pastiches invoke as much laughter as they do bits of social commentary.

The first video released was “Tacky“, a parody of Pharrell’s monster hit “Happy”, followed by “Word Crimes“, a parody of Robin Thicke, Pharrell, and T.I.’s “Blurred Lines”, “Foil“, a parody of “Royals” by Lorde, “First World Problems“, a tribute to the Pixies, “Handy“, a parody of Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy”, “Sports Song“, a parody of college fight songs, “Lame Claim to Fame“, a tribute to Southern Culture on the Skids, and “Mission Statement” a tribute to Crosby, Stills, Nash, and possibly Young.

In order to maintain the uniqueness of his songs, Weird Al made sure the videos were just as engaging, making more traditional music videos with the help of some celebrity guests and procuring the talents of animators for others. The animated videos specifically serve the purpose of bringing the songs to life in ways that live action would’ve faltered. For example, “Word Crimes”, an admonishment of the grammatical errors, syntax, and text speak that’s invaded our virtual lexicon, incorporates hilarious visual elements to point out just how lackadaisical we’ve gotten in our ability to write simple sentences while also incorporating the ridiculous flashing hashtags from Word Crimesthe source video. Even though “Blurred Lines” was released last year, Weird Al still manages to make the song relevent despite the gap between when the song was deemed a hit and the more current parodies on the album.

The inclusion of songs parodying hits like “Blurred Lines”, “Royals”, and “Radioactive”, though, shows the pitfalls of creating studio albums based in musical comedy. Now more than ever music and comedy have become mediums where relevancy is based in moments rather than the long-term. This is due in part to social media and our massive cultural Attention Deficit Disorder. A YouTube video or an article may get heavy rotation one day and, suddenly, the next day we’ve moved on to the next cat video or BuzzFeed quiz. We consume media as quickly as it’s produced and just as quickly discard it for the next shiny thing that comes our way. So one can imagine that crafting an entire album of parody songs is difficult when you have to pay attention to the Billboard charts for the hits you can work with as well as keep as up-to-date as possible. Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy” is the most current songweirdal referenced on Mandatory Fun, released in February of this year, and the inclusion of its comedic twin, “Handy”, on the album was more about having a song that was a current hit, which shows in comparison to the other eleven songs that were given more time and production value.

The album, however, doesn’t suffer when it comes to the timeliness of its songs. Yankovic, his band that still consists of Jon “Bermuda” Schwartz, Steve Jay, and Jim West, as well as the marketing team behind Mandatory Fun were smart in utilizing social media to launch the album via the eight videos. Not only did the videos individually saturate the internet, but the combined efforts and instant visibility of eight videos in a row catapulted Mandatory Fun into the #1 spot on Billboard, the first time in Weird Al’s 30 year career that one of his albums has charted so high in its debut week. And while there is some level of nostalgia surrounding Weird Al, there’s also genuine love and interest for the man behind the accordion and which songs he’ll tackle next. What Mandatory Fun’s marketing shows is how essential social media has become to the music industry and Weird Al as an artist.

tackyMandatory Fun has been confirmed to be Weird Al’s last traditional studio album with RCA Records, which is probably for the best if Yankovic plans to stick around. On a recent episode of Comedy Bang Bang, Yankovic was very candid about the fact that he’d rather have the freedom to produce a parody video or song around the same time the hit comes out as opposed to waiting and compiling songs for an album that can take up to two years to produce and distribute. With his plans to go completely digital, Weird Al will be able to create and distribute his work instantaneously, similar to the South Park method of animation production.

What does this mean for the viewing and listening audience? Simply this: more Weird Al!

It’s probably no surprise to anyone that I’m slightly obsessed with Rat Queens, the breakout comic from writer Kurtis J. Wiebe and artist Roc Upchurch. I mean, it’s not like I’ve reviewed every issue or interviewed the creative team as well as Wiebe’s other collaborative partner, Tyler Jenkins, the artist for Peter Panzerfaust. Oh wait, I totally did.ratqueens

Anyway, I’m not alone in my love of the kickass, foul-mouthed, all female quest group operating out of the much beleaguered city of Palisade. Wiebe and Upchurch have crafted a fantasy world with a modern attitude that has drawn in plenty of fans, male and female, to form their own community of social clubs, burlesque shows, cosplay, fan art, and online hangouts. And it seems that the popularity of the book will now extend into television.

Announced by Variety back in June, Rat Queens will be adapted into a 30-minute animated show by Weta Workshop’s Pukeko Pictures and Heavy Metal under the purview of executive producers Martin Baynton and Adam Fratto from Pukeko and Heavy Metal’s co-CEO Jeff Krelitz. Heavy Metal is also producing the television adaptation of Peter Panzerfaust for BBC Worldwide, adding to the wide variety of properties and mediums they’ve expanded to since the magazine that supplies the company name was bought from previous owner, Kevin Eastman – co-creator of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comic book.

rat-queens-by-wiebe-upchurch-coming-in-septem-L-tcurExAs a producer, Krelitz is eager to bring the exploits of Hannah, Dee, Violet, and Betty to the small screen, saying:

Rat Queens is a standout in the marketplace as a diving rod for fangirls, a market as yet untouched by most comics publishers. It is not only perfect for the TV space, but much needed.

Krelitz isn’t wrong in his assessment of the television landscape when it comes to courting female viewers. While the “fairer sex” as an audience will watch everything their male counterparts do, Rat Queens presents an untapped well in animation with four female protagonists who don’t conform to gender stereotypes. They’re awesome characters who happen to be women and their sex is never called into question by their male peers. If anything, the Rat Queens can out drink, out curse, and out fight most of the men they interact with or face off against. It’s a chance for a more mature audience to see that being a girl is by no means detrimental to your ability to stab out a troll’s eyes.

I took the liberty of reaching out to Kurtis J. Wiebe and Roc Upchurch to get thoughts on this next step in the journey that is the Rat Queens phenomenon.ratqueensbetty

Wiebe: It’s exciting to have interest from the TV world on both of my projects. It’s the sort of thing you don’t ever expect to happen, and when it does it’s pretty surreal. It can be a slow process, as I’ve come to learn from the Peter Panzerfaust option, which is fine by me because my focus is, and always has been, the comics.

Upchurch: I can’t wait to see Rat Queens animated. I think this will be a great platform for it. And it’s in good hands with WETA and Heavy Metal. They won’t fuck it up.

I completely agree with Upchurch’s excitement for Rat Queens to be animated. The fantasy genre is where a property like Rat Queens thrives in animation rather than live action where the special effects can range from passable to Syfy channel, low-budget, green screen fiascos. In animation, the possibilities are similar to the comics from which they originate, limitless. I only hope the adaptation sticks to Upchurch’s art style. It’s a distinct universe with equally distinct characters. The Rat Queens are a diverse group in terms of races, religions, and sexual orientation, so I hope Pukeko and Heavy Metal stay true to what Wiebe and Upchurch have created.

2986638-sheakoshan-acomicminutepeterpanzerfaust1928Peter Panzerfaust will also need a deft hand to bring it to television. Unlike Rat Queens, Peter Panzerfaust is made for live action. And considering the track record with mini series and television shows produced by the BBC with an historical slant, adapting a book that meshes J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan with WWII sounds like a daunting, yet ultimately rewarding task. Luckily, the production already has some excellent writers on board.

For the time being, both properties are in the pre-production phase. Scripts are being written and Heavy Metal plans to produce a pilot to shop around. Fingers crossed that a network takes advantage of a growing market of female-driven properties and the fans that follow them. In the mean time, please enjoy this motion comic trailer for Peter Panzerfaust that was produced back in 2013.