Archive for the ‘Ephemera’ Category

It’s been a pretty bad week and the year hasn’t been all that better, so this is my contribution for something a bit more positive within the sea of heart-breaking negativity in the world. I’ll be brief, and it’ll be back to my usual critical self soon enough, but I managed to experience the most wonderful and life affirming moments as a geek while at this year’s GeekGirlCon.

At the booth! Catherine Elhoffer (foreground) and Sam Cross (background)

At the booth! Catherine Elhoffer (foreground) and Sam Cross (background)

It started as a volunteer opportunity helping friend and past guest Catherine Elhoffer at her table. It was her first time exhibiting at GeekGirlCon and I was more than happy to lend a hand. Having never worked a booth before, I had no idea what to expect. As it turned out, I rarely left the table and it was the greatest two days I’ve ever had at a con!

It didn’t take long for people to notice Elhoffer Design‘s table. Catherine had all of her dresses laid out on the table, as well as sample pre-orders on display for everyone to see. By pure chance, the table happened to be right near the women’s bathroom, which gave women of all ages and sizes the opportunity to either try on the dresses in front of the table (no zippers, just over the head!) or in the bathroom should they need to remove costumes or clothing to get a better idea of the fit. Catherine, however, was pretty spot on regarding sizes and more often than not I saw a lot of women, and men, walk away with the right size, perfect fit, and huge smiles.

The biggest selling point on the dresses? Pockets. Not even kidding. I saw more faces light up when they discovered all of the dresses had pockets. Catherine and I even joked about having a camera pointed at people – mostly women – when they found the pockets while trying the dresses on or after we told them about the pockets when it looked like we hadn’t quite sold them on the dress alone. It may seem like a small thing, but trust me when I say women’s clothing has a severe deficiency when it comes to the inclusion of pockets. There have been a lot of studies about the gender politics of pockets, which I won’t go into now, but Catherine believes firmly in the equality of fashion. As she frequently said to anyone perusing the booth, “They [the dresses] have pockets because I’m a fucking adult.” Turns out, women don’t always want to lug a purse around. Sometimes we want to carry our shit in functional clothing. Go figure.banner_geekgirlcon

But above all else, the best part of working the booth was the people. Everyone was welcome to try on the clothes. Everyone. And with each person a new conversation occurred. Fandom, politics, clothing, you name it and we were talking about it. I couldn’t be happier and more proud to have been part of those conversations while seeing so much joy and passion come through. Seattle is a nerd/geek friendly town and they came out in droves to GeekGirlCon 2016. It’s getting bigger and better and I can’t wait to see what happens next year! And I can’t wait for more people to discover Elhoffer Design and Catherine Elhoffer. This lady deserves our support, so, if you can, I encourage you to check out her stuff!

If you’re local to the Seattle area, you should also consider helping Outsider Comics and Geek Boutique. The shop is opening in Fremont and they’ll be carrying Elhoffer Designs as part of their stock. Every little bit helps.

 

And, as always, Cosplay!

Booth Day 1

Booth Day 1

Han Solo

Han Solo

Eliza!

Eliza!

Belle with Tattoo

Belle with Tattoo

Gaston and Belle

Gaston and Belle

Queen/Senator Amidala

Queen/Senator Amidala

Spider-Gwen

Spider-Gwen

Rosie the Riveter

Rosie the Riveter

Cool Korra

Cool Korra

Link

Link

Silver Surfer

Silver Surfer

Enchantress

Enchantress

Cap and Peggy

Cap and Peggy

Uhura Squared

Uhura Squared

40s Unicron w/ disco ball

40s Unicron w/ disco ball

Princess R2-D2

Princess R2-D2

Powerpuff Girls

Powerpuff Girls

Lapis Lazuli

Lapis Lazuli

Left to Right: Rebel Fighter, Catherine Elhoffer, and Alexander Hamilton

Left to Right: Rebel Fighter, Catherine Elhoffer, and Alexander Hamilton

RainPoe Dash

RainPoe Dash

Rey

Rey

Steven Universe

Steven Universe

 

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fridayFull disclosure: I’m friends with Friday Elliot, owner and all around badass chick behind Friday Afternoon Tea, LLC. She’s adorable, wonderful, passionate, which is all to say the right person needed to provide the geek community with some pop-culture oriented teas to pair with our fandoms of choice. Her “Ravenclaw” blend is still one of my favorites and her “Tummy Soother” has really helped with my chronic stomach issues.

More full disclosure: Friday was a guest on my podcast some time ago after I met her at GeekGirlCon. It was more or less a “live” interview at the AFK Tavern’s now defunct second restaurant, but the friendship was sealed from minute one. The excitement and knowledge she has for tea and pop culture comes through in the podcast, but is just as true for any conversation I’ve had with her over the last couple of years. Her’s kid’s pretty cool too! Shout out to Allyn! Plus, you’ll get to learn my flavor profile!

So, yes, I want her newest Kickstarter campaign to succeed. Friday Afternoon Tea is looking to expand from an online shop to a for real brick-and-mortar establishment in the Phinney Ridge neighborhood of Seattle. Partnering with local shops and artists, Friday wants to create a safe and inclusive space for people to find their passion, and form a community, while sipping on some fine teas. There’s no doubt in my mind that Friday Afternoon Tea could be a fantastic and welcoming place for geeks, nerds, and dorks alike, so I encourage all of you – especially those of you in the Seattle area – to lend your support to this amazing woman and her amazing teas.

Go to: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/fridaytea/friday-afternoon-tea-is-expanding and make this a reality!

logo

I feel like that title loses something towards the end…

What would Rufio do?

bang

Eh, whatever!

If you’ve been lucky enough to see Scott Aukerman’s live comedy show turned podcast turned IFC television show turned touring live comedy show, then you know what it feels like when your stomach aches the next morning because you were laughing so hard you pulled a muscle you weren’t aware you had.

It’s one thing to listen to Aukerman and his rotating cast of comedians and “friends of the show” or watch many of the same comedy-bang-652x367-538x301people reprise their audio personas for the television show, but seeing the magic (I know, I’m groaning too) of live improv by people at the top of their game heightens the experience shared among the audience and performers. You laugh more because the people around you are laughing, creating an energy that’s palpable in the theater. The laughs, however, go deeper and last longer as each new guest builds upon previous riffs and alters the group dynamic on stage. Of course a live audience means some measure of interaction, instigated or otherwise, but it speaks to the skill of the performers that they never lose their cool or their rhythm while addressing their less-than-silent observers.

“But who were these hilariously adept comedians gracing the stage for your viewing pleasure?” I hear you asking me over the internet.

Excellent question. I’m glad you probably asked it. To answer it, here’s a brief synopsis of the tour’s second-to-last show in Seattle, Washington at the Moore Theater. If you actually want to listen to the show, which you can, you need only subscribe to Howl.fm where you can listen to all 21 performances. You can also tell me whether or not I’m remembering the night correctly because I love being corrected in a public forum.

Author’s Note: Do not inform me if I’m remembering the night correctly. Let me have my illusions!scottaukerman

Front and center was Scott Aukerman, the creator and host of Comedy Bang Bang. Aukerman practically bounded on to the stage of the Moore Theater and almost immediately focused in on the eleven-year-old boy seated in the front row, between his parents, for a show that was likely to go blue the minute he brought out the first guest. In his own words, “Now I want to swear more!” After making the customary comparisons to Portland, as is the traditional means of addressing Seattleites, Aukerman was very complimentary towards the city since the podcast recorded its first live show, under the Bang Bang banner, at the annual Bumbershoot music and arts festival in 2011. With his complimentary remarks out of the way, and a brief taunting of one of the stagehands off stage, Aukerman called out his first guest: Director Mr. Gary Marshall as portrayed by Paul F. Tompkins.

A regular guest with a plethora of characters in his repertoire (the Cake Boss, Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber, and Werner Herzog come to mind), Tompkins no doubt had his pick of whom to play. As Gary Marshall, the director of all the holiday movies, Tompkins revels in the cranky, pragmatic, yet easily excitable characterization he’s built over the last five years. What’s Marshallfantastic about Tompkins’s status as first guest is the time it gives him and Aukerman to keep their odd couple routine going throughout the entirety of the show. Though Aukerman typically takes on the straight man role as host of the podcast – and to a lesser extent on the television show – whenever Tompkins is a featured player the dynamic changes. Case in point, when Mr. Marshall came out on stage and chose the stool upon which to perch, Aukerman and he engaged in a game of Move-The-Sweat-Rags, which Aukerman commented were there to clean up the guests’ anal seepage. Less than a minute in and the pair quickly settled into their tried and true role reversal with Mr. Marshall acting as straight man to whatever inane thoughts sprang, barely formed, from Aukerman’s mouth. It’s all about the reaction from Tompkins; his bemused stare at Aukerman while the off-color comment gets a moment to breathe and the audience takes it in as well. After several minutes of testing Gary’s tolerance for Scott’s questions, it was time for the next guest to arrive: Manners Expert Carmella Pointe as portrayed by Lauren Lapkus.

Though Lapkus is fairly new to the Bang Bang rotation, she’s definitely earned her spot with fantastic and disturbing performances as Scott’s Nephew Todd, Ho-Ho the Elf, and Murphy O’Malaman. What’s most notable about Lapkus’s guest appearances is her fearlessness in saying the weirdest, darkest, and the most sexually charged musings if only to get a reaction out of Scott or the other guests. During her performance at the Moore, however, she debuted Carmella and quickly solidified IMG_7303her place among her growing list of characters by politely telling Scott to “kiss her fucking feet.” He obliged, of course, getting down on all fours, as is only polite in such situations. Mr. Marshall got a pass because he’s old. As a trio, Scott and Gary engaged Ms. Pointe in conversation over how to avoid being rude and to practice good manners via a smattering of hypothetical scenarios. One had Scott and Gary as gay couple Louie Anderson and Clive Owen, respectively, helping a pregnant woman through a revolving door post-public sexy times. Another revealed the dark secrets of Gary as the adopted son of Louie Anderson still hypothetically played by Scott. With the scenarios concluded, Aukerman moved on to the next guest: Candymaker Peter Finn as portrayed by Mike Hanford.

Hanford was actually the show’s opening act, taking over the position half way through the tour after Neil Campbell had to drop out. Those familiar with his appearances on the podcast know him for his performance as the very much still alive John Lennon, which Hanford brought out during his opening standup routine. He even managed to almost sing a love song to a girl named Kate. For the show proper, Hanford played Peter Finn, a man who sounds like a more depressed Nicolas Cage. Pining Lennonfor his wife who all but ran away from him, more specifically she rolled away in a giant tire down a hill, Peter could only express his feelings by singing somewhat to the tune of Little Shop of Horrors’ “Somewhere That’s Green.” What became the most entertaining aspect of the show was the interaction amongst the performers and their innate ability to make each other laugh. Lapkus was especially capable of cracking Tompkins with her amazingly foul mouth. Hanford, however, managed to get them both with a combination of the lovelorn candymaker’s wispy voice and his surprisingly fancy footwork. The three combined, however, were nearly overshadowed by the dulcet monotone of LinkedIn Creative Officer Tom Boreman portrayed by Tim Baltz.

Though he was the last performer brought out, Baltz’s Boreman quickly made for a distinct voice and personality in comparison to the other comedians. And by distinct I mean flat and sorely lacking. It paid off in spades, however, when Boreman attempted to explain LinkedIn to the perplexed panel of characters and said the magic word, “Boolean.” If you don’t know what a Boolean search is, I encourage you to look it up, but Boreman’s attempt to explain the Boolean to the others Baltzmade for some of the most intense laughter from both on and off the stage. I’m cracking myself up as I type this because I remember Baltz’s voice and the frequency of him saying “Boolean” in answer to any questions put forth about the excitingly lackluster functionality of LinkedIn. Basically, the last ten minutes of this show would be worth the Howl.fm subscription. Trust me, I don’t say this lightly.

By the end of the night, the show gave me the much needed gift of laughter, a new appreciation for the word Boolean, and something to think about in terms of the proper actions when helping pregnant women into buildings while carrying ten bags of designer clothing. And isn’t that what live podcasts are supposed to do?

I wanna say…probably?

That’s right, you. You’re the one who’s still obsessed with the greatest musical that ever musicaled. Not me. You. You’re the one who goes to bed singing “The Schuyler Sisters”. You’re the one who wakes up with Washington’s rap from “Right Hand Man” bouncing around your skull. You’re the one who uses the Aaron Burr, Sir rhyming scheme nonstop. You’re the one who referenced another Hamilton song within a sentence about your obsessive need to incorporate the previous song into your daily life.AR-AK469_Theate_P_20150806131612

Okay, that escalated quickly.

But fear not, readers, for I have come here to curate a sampling of Founding Fathers/American Revolution themed media that’s sure to continue enabling my obsession. I mean your obsession.

#Ham4Ham

Let’s start with an easy one. Perhaps this obsession has also become entwined with your love of Broadway and musicals in general. Well, never fear, you can fall down the rabbit hole of Ham4Ham videos on YouTube where the cast and crew, under the direction of Lin-Manuel Miranda, perform for an audience of hundreds participating in a lottery for tickets to the show. A mere ten dollars gets you a five minute performance from the stars of Hamilton or from some of the many familiar faces from Broadway’s past and present.

Drunk History

The one that started it all. Need I say more?

Histeria

As I mentioned in the latest podcast, Histeria was a show created by the same teams responsible for Animaniacs and Pinky and the Brain. It was a show designed to – get this – make history entertaining for kids and pre-teens. Weird, right? It only aired for two years and it has yet to be released on DVD, but you can watch the episodes on YouTube for free! Best of all, they have several episodes devoted to the American Revolution featuring a very Bob Hope-esque George Washington.

Schoolhouse Rock!

It was a simpler time…

Founding Fathers Rapping

Need more Revolution Era rap? Looks like JibJab might have beat Lin-Manuel Miranda by a few years…

1776

In need of more Founding Fathers singing that isn’t rap? Okay, I guess that’s cool. Well look no further than 1776, a musical about the creation, ratification, and signing of the Declaration of Independence. You won’t find any signs of Hamilton here, but John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin sure now how to…sing about eggs.

HBO’s John Adams Mini-Series

Wondering why Alexander Hamilton had such a problem with John Adams? Well maybe watching a bunch of clips from the miniseries will make clear what’s only glossed over in the musical. Adapted from David McCullough’s biography of John Adams, we see the Revolution and the Early Republic through the eyes of one of the less popular presidents. Paul Giamatti carries the miniseries deftly upon his shoulders, but he’s also surrounded by an impressive cast of amazing actors, including Rufu Sewell as Hamilton.

 

That Time George Washington Totally Fought Robin, the Boy Wonder

You heard me.

Well, hopefully that keeps me you satisfied for the time being. Lord knows it’s hard to say no to this craving for more Hamilton oriented media, but I’ll you’ll just have to hunker down and wait for it to calm down. Then, maybe, we can get some work done around here, people!

Hark! A Vagrant by Kate Beaton

Hark! A Vagrant by Kate Beaton

While I recover from three days of exhaustion and sheer joy, and begin the process of transcribing some interviews, here’s some video taken by yours truly of the D20 Brass Band performing outside the Washington State Convention Center at Emerald City Comicon!d20-brass-band-mugshot

Because I’m absolutely in love with DC Comic’s Gotham Academy, written by Becky Cloonan and Brenden Fletcher and drawn by Karl Kerschl, I decided to make the first day’s programming for what I think would be a sampling of movies shown at a Gotham City film festival. gotham-academy_612x929

Really, the point of this is you should be reading Gotham Academy. Along with Batgirl, it’s really one of the best titles published by DC that appeals to all-ages, women, and POCs. Unfortunately, sales have gone down, so I encourage all of you to go out there, buy and read about the exploits of Olive Silverlock and Mia “Maps” Mizoguchi as they investigate the mysteries of Gotham Academy. C’mon, guys. it’s basically Harry Potter meets Batman with the occasional appearance by Bruce Wayne. Stupid, sexy Bruce Wayne…

But I digress. Check out the Friday programming and see how many Easter eggs you can find. What do you think Saturday and Sunday’s programming would include?

GAFF1GAFF2GAFF3

I’ve been a bit slack on post lately, but January hasn’t turned out to be the greatest start to the new year like I thought it would be. Plus, I’ve been busy with other projects that are a bit time sensitive. Regardless, posting should pick up a bit soon but until then I thought I’d share some videos that highlight the comedic awesomeness that is John Larroquette.635538201565431802-VIP-Larroquette-121414.JPG

Why?

Well, mostly because The Librarians just wrapped up on TNT (no idea if it’ll get a second season) and a co-worker and I had a recent conversation about Night Court that stuck with me. Or rather, the theme song for Night Court stuck with me. So I’ve had Mr. Larroquette on the brain and now you all will as well!

Bwahahaha! Enjoy!

Dan Fielding – Night Court (1984-19992)

John Hemingway – The John Laroquette Show (1993-1996)

Lionel Tribbey – The West Wing “And It’s Surely To Their Credit”

Tony Lewis – The 10th Kingdom (2000)

J.B. Biggley – How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying

Himself – Futurama “Luck of the Fryrish”

Saturday Night Live

Jenkins – The Librarians

robin_batgirl_batman

In honor of the 5th anniversary of the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, a friend of mine at the National Archives Motion Picture Preservation Lab, Heide Holstrom, did a write-up about the significance of the Fair Pay Act:

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 was the first piece of legislation signed by President Barack Obama. It updated the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which had made it illegal for employers to discriminate on the basis of sex when determining pay for employees doing the same work.

The 2009 Act resets the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal pay lawsuit each time a paycheck reflecting a discriminatory pay decision is issued. It was named for Lilly Ledbetter, whose equal-pay suit against her employer was dismissed by the Supreme Court because she had not filed it within 180 days of the discriminatory pay decision. Ledbetter says she was not aware of the pay discrepancy during that window of time.

To emphasize the importance and significance of this piece of legislation, the post included the 1973 Public Service Announcement (PSA) from the US Department of Labor Wage & Hour Division featuring Yvonne Craig reprising her role as Batgirl from the 1966 Batman television series to inform Batman and Robin that her job as a sidekick to Batman, the same job as Robin (Burt Ward reprising his role as well), meant she deserved equal pay. As Heidi later points out, even in 1973, ten years after Congress had passed the Equal Pay Act, women were still being paid less than their male counterparts. I mean, how else is a girl gonna pay for a rotating wall in a well-furnished apartment and keep up maintainance on a purple motorcycle on a librarian’s salary alone? Also, for shame millionaire Bruce Wayne! You’re a millionaire and your other sidekick lives with you! I think you could afford to pay Babs just as much, if not more than Dick. Now I know why Catwoman turned to a life of crime. It actually pays better.

So when you go out to buy your DVD/Blu-ray of the complete 1960’s Batman TV Series, or read DC Comics’ ongoing Batman ’66 digital-first book, remember that Batgirl ain’t getting paid as much as Robin. Kinda makes you wonder where Barbara was actually getting the money to support her crimefighting career.

Oh, and as a bonus because the ’73 PSA was clearly sans Mr. West, Heidi also included a 1966 PSA from the real Batman, Adam West, encouraging kids to buy war bonds for the Vietnam War.

Obviously it’s not the first time superheroes have been utilized to encourage patriotism in kids through purchasing war bonds, but I’ll be damned if West doesn’t sell the hell out it with his sincerity. Also gotta love the poster taped to the Bat-cave wall!

If you want to see more of what’s at the National Archives Special Media Archives Services Division, and I know you do, check out their blog. You never know when something special can turn up in the Archives.

Yes, I know, shameless plug, but I make no apologies. Until then, kids, same Bat-time, same Bat-channel!

Night Vale LogoNot too long ago, I had the chance to see a live show of Welcome to Night Vale as the popular podcast does its tour of the West Coast. The audience was kindly asked not to reveal any details of the touring script since it would eventually be recorded as an actual episode of the podcast, so this won’t exactly be a recounting of the funny as hell and eerily satisfying experience of watching a live performance piece. Instead, I’d rather focus on why Night Vale works as theater and as a podcast. Why has a, until recently, unknown podcast combining elements of Alfred Hitchcock, Stephen King, George Orwell, H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, Rod Serling, and David Lynch captured the imaginations of fans around the world? Simply put: Night Vale relies on the fans to fill in the blanks, creating the world of Night Vale through a combination of being very specific and very vague.

Created over a year ago by Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, Welcome to Night Vale is a podcast centered around the town of Night Vale – which seems to be in an as-yet unknown location in the American Southwest – and the seemingly mundane things that happen to occur there as reported by the Night Vale Community Radio host, Cecil Palmer, voiced by Cecil Baldwin. On any given day, Cecil could report on the angels that took up residence with Old Woman Josie for a time, the Dog Park that no one is allowed to go to, speak about, or think of, or the helicopters of various colors that correspond to specific groups keeping tabs on the town. There are also several ongoing storylines such as the upcoming mayoral election between Hiram McDaniels (a five-headed dragon) and the Faceless Old Woman (the one who lives in your home), the current corporate infiltration of Night Vale by StrexCorp, and Cecil’s relationship with Carlos, a scientist who moved to Night Vale to study the phenomena that make it the “most scientifically interesting community in the U.S.”

Hiram McDaniels tumblr_mr6v0qvbBd1rl3zxmo1_500

Art by meeshyarts

As you can see, there’s a lot going on in the seemingly normal town where a mountain can randomly appear and citizens are mandated by the local government to eat at a pizza place once a week on penalty of a misdemeanor. Within each roughly 25 minute episode, listeners are given more insight into the workings of Night Vale while also being treated to the entertainingly weird underbelly of the town and its residents. The popularity of the podcast is due entirely to its fanbase, which is true of any podcast, but Night Vale’s rise has an element of interaction with its fans that differs from other popular podcasts like This American Life, The Nerdist, and The Moth. Night Vale isn’t about interviewing a celebrity or telling personal stories. Night Vale is theater of the mind, a program that requires its fans to “see” everything that’s happening based solely on Cecil’s descriptions. Because of this, the imagination of the fanbase is an additional element of Night Vale’s popularity and its success.

Like most radio shows, Night Vale has to be overly descriptive in order to establish its own reality and set the tone of each episode. So when Hiram McDaniels is revealed to be an “eighteen-foot-tall, five-headed dragon, weighing 3,600 pounds” and each head has differently colored eyes and voices, we get a picture of him in our minds but there’s also enough latitude there that someone with artistic talent could take the description and create a version of Hiram that’s no less accurate than another fan’s rendition. In contrast, incumbent Mayor Pamela Winchell has had very little said in the way of her personal appearance, but Cecil has provided many broadcasts that describe her near-demonic personality, which also allows the imaginations of fans to run with what they think Pamela looks like. Similarly, we have a vague idea of what Carlos looks like based on how Cecil described him in the pilot episode, but in 39 episodes of the podcast we have absolutely no idea of what Cecil looks like. Some have used his voice actor as a template, but many fans have essentially crafted their own image of Cecil out of thin air, though there does seem to be a running theme of adding a third eye. Even the community of Night Vale is a vague collection of buildings and landmarks, none of which are entirely set in stone by some map of the area. By keeping it intentionally vague, the creators can easily use the layout of the city at their leisure, but it still allows the fans to speculate and create. Plus, it’s really hard to put a house that may not exist on a map.

Cecil and Carlos spam_vale_by_littleulvar-d6jy07g

Art by littleulvar

Night Vale has also benefited greatly from social media outlets, specifically tumblr, where fans have formed their own communities that share insights on the episodes or whatever pieces they’ve created to express their fandom. Again, it’s no different from any other podcast, television show, or movie with loyal fans. But Night Vale isn’t like Supernatural, which has a healthy and active fanbase present on pretty much every social media platform. Supernatural is a live-action television show, one that gives its fanbase visual depictions of its characters and settings. So if someone dresses up like Castiel, Dean, or Sam there are ways in which that costume or any pieces of art can be compared to the television counterpart. Night Vale’s cast and settings exist entirely in the head cannon of the fanbase. You’d be hard-pressed to find someone criticized because their Glow Cloud costume wasn’t accurate. More so than live-action or animated programs, Night Vale lives and breathes on the investment of the fanbase in the show and the characters. God forbid Cecil and Carlos ever broke up is all I’m saying.

That’s why I think the live shows continue to work. Very little changes in terms of how the show is presented except for a live musical performance for the weather segment and the presence of Cecil Baldwin reading the script. Cecil is still in character and the news reported is still of the same quality. The only real difference is the presence of the audience, but even then there’s still a sense of the audience perpetuating the illusion of the podcast. Sure, there are more audible reactions to what Cecil reports, but the audience doesn’t need visual cues. We know Carlos, Steve Carlsberg, and Tamika Flynn but we don’t need the live show to give us a definitive image. We already have the idea in our heads and all we really need is Cecil to transport us to a sleepy little desert town where our existence is not impossible, but it’s also highly unlikely.

A good laugh can get you through a whole day. A maniacal laugh lets you siphon off all those “crazy” plans stewing in your brain and gives those around you a slight pause to consider just how far they’re willing to push you.

So, start wringing those hands and grinning like a Maniac and belt it out!

It’s Christopher Lee. ‘Nuff said. Also check out his heavy metal Christmas songs!